Thank you Dr. King: Free at Last


50 years ago I was two years old. Other than the stories my parents told me, I was a playful, boisterous, forthright child and generally, quite happy.  I had no idea of what my parents suffered on a day to day basis, or would have absolutely no idea of what our relatives in Flat Bush, New York experienced.  It was as I got older, there was a clear understanding that we were different; I was forced to realise that our skin colour made us different. It was the reason why we would run (or sometimes stand and fight!) when we were confronted by skinheads or when the careers teacher at school laughed in your face after telling him you wanted to go to University.

Having just finished watching Martin Luther King and the March on Washington (BBC2) it reminded me of when my parents told me of the time they listened to this speech on the radio. They were moved and inspired; it gave them hope and in particular the strength to be hopeful for their children. I’m grateful for this but I’m also grateful to Dr. King and the other leaders that contributed in breaking the back of the injustices of those times, and those, who still today continue to fight those problems which are still present. Some people would argue that racism is rife and there is still a lot of work to be done, but for myself, my parents and their generation made it possible for me to achieve more, experience more and ultimately to continue, to dream more. Thank you Dr. King.

About these ads

2 thoughts on “Thank you Dr. King: Free at Last

  1. Just dropping by to say that I love your blog. As a Black American anglophile it’s been very frustrating to find blogs and articles that talk about race from the perspective of someone other than the majority. Your writings have been a wonderful, thought provoking read.

    • Many thanks for your wonderful words. I’ve checked your blog and your writing is wonderful, so expressive. I definitely intend to make frequent visits. I’ve not written anything in a while as I find myself moving steadily to all things spiritual and therefore spend time reading. Black issues within the community will always be paramount but I’m curious about this direction I seem to be drawn to. Let’s see what happens. Lots of blessings to you!

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s